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Prevalence and associated risk factors of intestinal parasitic infections among children in pastoralist and agro-pastoralist communities in the Adadle woreda of the Somali Regional State of Ethiopia
JournalArticle (Originalarbeit in einer wissenschaftlichen Zeitschrift)
 
ID 4694726
Author(s) Lanker, K. C.; Muhummed, A. M.; Cissé, G.; Zinsstag, J.; Hattendorf, J.; Yusuf, R. B.; Hassen, S. B.; Tschopp, R.; Vonaesch, P.
Author(s) at UniBasel Lanker, Kayla
Muhummed, Abdifatah Muktar
Cissé, Guéladio
Zinsstag, Jakob
Hattendorf, Jan
Tschopp, Rea
Year 2023
Title Prevalence and associated risk factors of intestinal parasitic infections among children in pastoralist and agro-pastoralist communities in the Adadle woreda of the Somali Regional State of Ethiopia
Journal PLoS Negl Trop Dis
Volume 17
Number 7
Pages / Article-Number e0011448
Mesh terms Animals; Cattle; Prevalence; Ethiopia, epidemiology; Somalia; Chickens; Intestinal Diseases, Parasitic, parasitology; Risk Factors; Feces, parasitology
Abstract BACKGROUND: Intestinal parasitic infections (IPIs) can cause illness, morbidity, and occasional mortality in children. Agro-pastoralist and pastoralist children in the Somali Regional State of Ethiopia (ESRS) are especially at risk for IPIs, as access to safe water, sanitation, and health services is lacking. Minimal data on the prevalence of IPIs and associated risk factors exists in this region. METHODOLOGY: We assessed the prevalence of IPIs and associated risk factors during the wet season from May-June 2021 in 366 children aged 2 to 5 years in four agro-pastoralist and four pastoralist kebeles (wards) in Adadle woreda (district) of the Shebelle zone, ESRS. Household information, anthropometric measurements, and stool samples were obtained from included children. Parasites were identified microscopically using Kato-Katz and direct smear methods. Risk factors were assessed using general estimating equation models accounting for clustering. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Overall prevalence of IPIs was 35%: 30.6% for single infections and 4.4% for poly-parasitic infections. Intestinal protozoan prevalence was 24.9%: 21.9% Giardia intestinalis, and 3.0% Entamoeba spp.. Intestinal helminth prevalence was 14.5%: 12.8% Ascaris lumbricoides, 1.4% hookworm (Ancylostoma duodenale /Necator americanus.), and 0.3% Hymenolepis nana. G. intestinalis infection was associated with drinking water sourced from the river (aOR 15.6, 95%CI 6.84, 35.4) and from collected rainwater (aOR 9.48, 95%CI 3.39, 26.5), with toilet sharing (aOR 2.93, 95%CI 1.36, 6.31) and with household ownership of cattle (1-5 cattle: aOR 1.65, 95%CI 1.13, 2.41; 6+ cattle: aOR 2.07, 95%CI 1.33, 3.21) and chickens (aOR 3.80, 95%CI 1.77, 8.17). A. lumbricoides infection was associated with children 36 to 47 months old (aOR 1.92, 95%CI 1.03, 3.58). CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Improving access to safe water, sanitation, and hygiene services in Adadle and employing a One Health approach would likely improve the health of children living in (agro-) pastoralist communities in Adadle and the ESRS; however, further studies are required.
ISSN/ISBN 1935-2735 (Electronic), 1935-2727 (Linking)
URL https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pntd.0011448
edoc-URL https://edoc.unibas.ch/95316/
Full Text on edoc Available
Digital Object Identifier DOI 10.1371/journal.pntd.0011448
PubMed ID http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/37399193
ISI-Number WOS:001025356500003
Document type (ISI) Journal Article
 
   

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20/06/2024