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Myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS): a preliminary survey among patients in Switzerland
JournalArticle (Originalarbeit in einer wissenschaftlichen Zeitschrift)
 
ID 4665710
Author(s) Tschopp, R.; König, R. S.; Rejmer, P.; Paris, D. H.
Author(s) at UniBasel Paris, Daniel Henry
Tschopp, Rea
Year 2023
Title Myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS): a preliminary survey among patients in Switzerland
Journal Heliyon
Volume 9
Number 5
Pages / Article-Number e15595
Abstract Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS) is a multi-factorial systemic chronic debilitating disease of poorly understood etiology and limited systematic evidence. The questionnaire and interview-based survey included 169 ME/CFS patients from the Swiss ME/CFS association. The majority of patients were females (72.2%), single (55.7%) and without children (62.5%). Only one third were working (full/part-time). The mean onset of ME/CFS was 31.6 years of age with 15% of patients being symptomatic before their 18th birthday. In this cohort, patients had documented ME/CFS for a mean 13.7 years, whereby half (50.3%) stated their condition was progressively worsening. Triggering events and times of disease onset were recalled by 90% of the participants. An infectious disease was associated with a singular or part of multiple events by 72.9% and 80.6%, respectively. Prior to disease onset, a third of the patients reported respiratory infections; followed by gastro-intestinal infections (15.4%) and tick-borne diseases (16.2%). Viral infections were recalled by 77.8% of the respondents, with Epstein Barr Virus being the most commonly reported agent. Patients self-reported an average number of 13 different symptoms, all described specific triggers of symptoms exacerbation and 82.2% suffered from co-morbidities. This study collated clinically relevant information on ME/CFS patients in Switzerland, highlighting the extent of disease severity, the associated factors negatively affecting daily life activities and work status as well as potential socio-economic impact.
ISSN/ISBN 2405-8440 (Print)2405-8440 (Electronic)2405-8440 (Linking)
URL https://doi.org/10.1016/j.heliyon.2023.e15595
edoc-URL https://edoc.unibas.ch/94599/
Full Text on edoc Available
Digital Object Identifier DOI 10.1016/j.heliyon.2023.e15595
PubMed ID http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/37131449
Document type (ISI) Journal Article
 
   

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