Data Entry: Please note that the research database will be replaced by UNIverse by the end of October 2023. Please enter your data into the system https://universe-intern.unibas.ch. Thanks

Login for users with Unibas email account...

Login for registered users without Unibas email account...

 
Antimicrobial resistance through the lens of one health in Ethiopia: a review of the literature among humans, animals, and the environment
JournalArticle (Originalarbeit in einer wissenschaftlichen Zeitschrift)
 
ID 4651577
Author(s) Fujita, A. W.; Werner, K.; Jacob, J. T.; Tschopp, R.; Mamo, G.; Mihret, A.; Abdissa, A.; Kempker, R.; Rebolledo, P. A.
Author(s) at UniBasel Tschopp, Rea
Year 2022
Title Antimicrobial resistance through the lens of one health in Ethiopia: a review of the literature among humans, animals, and the environment
Journal Int J Infect Dis
Volume 119
Pages / Article-Number 120-129
Keywords Ethiopia; One Health; antimicrobial resistance
Mesh terms Animals; Anti-Bacterial Agents, therapeutic use; Bacteria; Drug Resistance, Bacterial; Escherichia coli; Ethiopia, epidemiology; Humans; Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus; Microbial Sensitivity Tests; One Health; Staphylococcus aureus
Abstract OBJECTIVES: We aimed to review and describe antimicrobial resistance (AMR) prevalence in humans, animals, and the environment in Ethiopia. METHODS: We conducted a structured review of the literature on AMR in humans, animals, and the environment in Ethiopia from 2016 to 2020. We reported the pooled prevalence of AMR of bacterial pathogens in all three sectors. RESULTS: We included 43 articles in our review. Only five studies evaluated AMR across multiple sectors. The most common bacteria in humans were Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Staphylococcus aureus. High prevalence of resistance to third-generation cephalosporins, fluoroquinolones, and sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim were seen in gram-negative organisms, often with >50% prevalence of resistance. Highest resistance rates were seen in humans, followed by environmental isolates. Salmonella spp. exhibited higher rates of resistance than previously reported in the literature. We found methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) in approximately half of S. aureus from the environment and a third from human isolates. Few studies evaluated AMR across all three sectors. CONCLUSION: Our review demonstrated high prevalence of AMR among bacteria in humans, animals, and the environment in Ethiopia. Integrating a One Health approach into AMR surveillance as part of Ethiopia's national surveillance program will inform future implementation of One Health interventions.
ISSN/ISBN 1878-3511 (Electronic)1201-9712 (Linking)
URL https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijid.2022.03.041
edoc-URL https://edoc.unibas.ch/90474/
Full Text on edoc Available
Digital Object Identifier DOI 10.1016/j.ijid.2022.03.041
PubMed ID http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/35358724
ISI-Number WOS:000861341500006
Document type (ISI) Journal Article, Review
 
   

MCSS v5.8 PRO. 0.320 sec, queries - 0.000 sec ©Universität Basel  |  Impressum   |    
19/06/2024