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Diarrhoea among children aged under five years and risk factors in informal settlements: a cross-sectional study in Cape Town, South Africa
JournalArticle (Originalarbeit in einer wissenschaftlichen Zeitschrift)
 
ID 4646216
Author(s) Nguyen, T. Y. C.; Fagbayigbo, B. O.; Cissé, G.; Redi, N.; Fuhrimann, S.; Okedi, J.; Schindler, C.; Röösli, M.; Armitage, N. P.; Carden, K.; Dalvie, M. A.
Author(s) at UniBasel Nguyen, Thi Yen Chi
Cissé, Guéladio
Fuhrimann, Samuel
Schindler, Christian
Röösli, Martin
Year 2021
Title Diarrhoea among children aged under five years and risk factors in informal settlements: a cross-sectional study in Cape Town, South Africa
Journal Int J Environ Res Public Health
Volume 18
Number 11
Pages / Article-Number 6043
Mesh terms Child; Cross-Sectional Studies; Diarrhea, epidemiology; Humans; Risk Factors; Sanitation; South Africa, epidemiology
Abstract Background: There is limited data on the association between diarrhoea among children aged under five years (U5D) and water use, sanitation, hygiene, and socio-economics factors in low-income communities. The study investigated U5D and the associated risk factors in the Zeekoe catchment in Cape Town, South Africa. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in 707 households in six informal settlements (IS) two formal settlements (FS) (March-June 2017). Results: Most IS households used public taps (74.4%) and shared toilets (93.0%), while FS households used piped water on premises (89.6%) and private toilets (98.3%). IS respondents had higher average hand-washing scores than those of FS (0.04 vs.
URL https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18116043
edoc-URL https://edoc.unibas.ch/89346/
Full Text on edoc Available
Digital Object Identifier DOI 10.3390/ijerph18116043
PubMed ID http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/34199733
ISI-Number WOS:000659932800001
Document type (ISI) Journal Article
 
   

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