Lived experiences and perceptions of childbirth among pastoralist women in north-eastern Ethiopia: a multimethod qualitative analysis to the WHO health systems responsiveness framework
JournalArticle (Originalarbeit in einer wissenschaftlichen Zeitschrift)
 
ID 4646015
Author(s) Zepro, N.B.; Medhanyie, A.A.; Bezabih, A.M.; Tarr, N.; Merten, S.
Author(s) at UniBasel Zepro, Nejimu
Merten, Sonja
Tarr, Natalie
Year 2021
Title Lived experiences and perceptions of childbirth among pastoralist women in north-eastern Ethiopia: a multimethod qualitative analysis to the WHO health systems responsiveness framework
Journal Int J Environ Res Public Health
Volume 18
Number 23
Pages / Article-Number 12518
Abstract

Maternity should be a time of hope and joy. However, for women in pastoralist communities in Ethiopia, the reality of motherhood is often grim. This problem is creating striking disparities of skilled birth uptake among the agrarian and pastoral communities in Ethiopia. So far, the depth and effects of the problem are not well understood. This study is intended to fill this research gap by exploring mothers’ lived experiences and perceptions during skilled birthing care in hard-to-reach communities of Ethiopia. An Interpretive Phenomenological approach was employed to analyse the exploratory data. Four key informant interviews, six in-depth interviews, six focus group discussions, and twelve focused observations were held. WHO responsiveness domains formed the basis for coding and analysis: dignity, autonomy, choice of provider, prompt attention, communication, social support, confidentiality, and quality of basic amenities. The skilled birthing experience of nomadic mothers is permeated by a deep-rooted and hidden perceived neglect, which constitutes serious challenges to the health system. Mothers’ experiences reflect not only the poor skilled delivery uptake, but also how health system practitioners are ignorant of Afar women’s way of life, their living contexts, and their values and beliefs regarding giving birth. Three major themes emerged from data analysis: bad staff attitude, lack of culturally acceptable care, and absence of social support. Nomadic mothers require health systems that are responsive and adaptable to their needs, beliefs, and values. The abuse and disrespect they experience from providers deter nomadic women from seeking skilled birthing care. Women’s right to dignified, respectful, skilled delivery care requires the promotion of woman-centred care in a culturally appropriate manner. Skilled birthing care providers should be cognizant of the WHO responsiveness domains to ensure the provision of culturally sensitive birthing care.

URL https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph182312518
Full Text on edoc
Digital Object Identifier DOI 10.3390/ijerph182312518
   

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26/11/2022