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Fecal Microbiota Transplantation (FMT) as an Adjunctive Therapy for Depression-Case Report
JournalArticle (Originalarbeit in einer wissenschaftlichen Zeitschrift)
 
ID 4641769
Author(s) Doll, Jessica P. K.; Vázquez-Castellanos, Jorge F.; Schaub, Anna-Chiara; Schweinfurth, Nina; Kettelhack, Cedric; Schneider, Else; Yamanbaeva, Gulnara; Mählmann, Laura; Brand, Serge; Beglinger, Christoph; Borgwardt, Stefan; Raes, Jeroen; Schmidt, André; Lang, Undine E.
Author(s) at UniBasel Brand, Serge
Year 2022
Title Fecal Microbiota Transplantation (FMT) as an Adjunctive Therapy for Depression-Case Report
Journal Frontiers in Psychiatry
Volume 13
Pages / Article-Number 815422
Keywords FMT,Depression,gastrointestinal,microbiome-gut-brain axis (MGBA),case report
Abstract Depression is a debilitating disorder, and at least one third of patients do not respond to therapy. Associations between gut microbiota and depression have been observed in recent years, opening novel treatment avenues. Here, we present the first two patients with major depressive disorder ever treated with fecal microbiota transplantation as add-on therapy. Both improved their depressive symptoms 4 weeks after the transplantation. Effects lasted up to 8 weeks in one patient. Gastrointestinal symptoms, constipation in particular, were reflected in microbiome changes and improved in one patient. This report suggests further FMT studies in depression could be worth pursuing and adds to awareness as well as safety assurance, both crucial in determining the potential of FMT in depression treatment.
Publisher Frontiers Research Foundation
ISSN/ISBN 1664-0640
URL https://www.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fpsyt.2022.815422
edoc-URL https://edoc.unibas.ch/87890/
Full Text on edoc Available
Digital Object Identifier DOI 10.3389/fpsyt.2022.815422
PubMed ID http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/35250668
ISI-Number MEDLINE:35250668
Document type (ISI) Case Reports
 
   

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