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Safety of co-administration versus separate administration of the same vaccines in children: a systematic literature review
JournalArticle (Originalarbeit in einer wissenschaftlichen Zeitschrift)
 
ID 4525100
Author(s) Bauwens, J.; Saenz, L. H.; Reusser, A.; Künzli, N.; Bonhoeffer, J.
Author(s) at UniBasel Künzli, Nino
Year 2019
Title Safety of co-administration versus separate administration of the same vaccines in children: a systematic literature review
Journal Vaccines (Basel)
Volume 8
Number 1
Pages / Article-Number 12
Abstract The growing number of available vaccines that can be potentially co-administered makes the assessment of the safety of vaccine co-administration increasingly relevant but complex. We aimed to synthesize the available scientific evidence on the safety of vaccine co-administrations in children by performing a systematic literature review of studies assessing the safety of vaccine co-administrations in children between 1999 and 2019, in line with Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. Fifty studies compared co-administered vaccines versus the same vaccines administered separately. The most frequently studied vaccines included quadrivalent meningococcal conjugate (MenACWY) vaccine, diphtheria and tetanus toxoids and acellular pertussis (DTaP) or tetanus toxoid, reduced diphtheria toxoid and acellular pertussis (Tdap) vaccines, diphtheria and tetanus toxoids and acellular pertussis adsorbed, hepatitis B, inactivated poliovirus and Haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate (DTaP-HepB-IPV/Hib) vaccine, measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine, and pneumococcal conjugate 7-valent (PCV7) or 13-valent (PCV13) vaccines. Of this, 16% (n = 8) of the studies reported significantly more adverse events following immunization (AEFI) while in 10% (n = 5) significantly fewer adverse events were found in the co-administration groups. Statistically significant differences between co-administration and separate administration were found for 16 adverse events, for 11 different vaccine co-administrations. In general, studies briefly described safety and one-third of studies lacked any statistical assessment of AEFI. Overall, the evidence on the safety of vaccine co-administrations compared to separate vaccine administrations is inconclusive and there is a paucity of large post-licensure studies addressing this issue.
Publisher MDPI
ISSN/ISBN 2076-393X (Print)
edoc-URL https://edoc.unibas.ch/74212/
Full Text on edoc Available
Digital Object Identifier DOI 10.3390/vaccines8010012
PubMed ID http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31906218
ISI-Number MEDLINE:31906218
Document type (ISI) Journal Article, Review
 
   

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