Innate and learned olfactory attraction to flowering plants by the parasitoid Cotesia rubecula (Marshall, 1885) (Hymenoptera: Braconidae): Potential impacts on conservation biological control
JournalArticle (Originalarbeit in einer wissenschaftlichen Zeitschrift)
 
ID 4522473
Author(s) Fataar, Shakira; Kahmen, Ansgar; Luka, Henryk
Author(s) at UniBasel Kahmen, Ansgar
Fataar, Shakira
Year 2019
Title Innate and learned olfactory attraction to flowering plants by the parasitoid Cotesia rubecula (Marshall, 1885) (Hymenoptera: Braconidae): Potential impacts on conservation biological control
Journal BIOLOGICAL CONTROL
Volume 132
Pages / Article-Number 16-22
Keywords Braconidae; Olfactometer; Parasitoids; Attraction; Flower odor; Associative learning
Mesh terms Science & TechnologyLife Sciences & BiomedicineBiotechnology & Applied MicrobiologyEntomologyBiotechnology & Applied MicrobiologyEntomology
Abstract In conservation biological control, flowers can be used to increase the biological control potential of parasitoids, which benefit from the offered food sources. Besides exhibiting exploitable nectar, flowers should preferably be olfactorily attractive, as highly attractive flowers are easily located, reducing the time spent searching for food and subsequently increasing the per capita host searching efficiency. In this study we thus focused on the olfactory attractiveness of Fagopyrum esculentum Moench (Polygonaceae), Centaurea cyanus L. (Asteraceae) and Vicia sativa L. (Fabaceae) to Cotesia rubecula (Marshall, 1885) (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), a larval parasitoid of the cabbage pest Pieris rapae (Linnaeus, 1758) (Lepidoptera: Pieridae). With a Y-tube olfactometer we found that C. cyanus and to a lesser extent V. sativa successfully attract C. rubecula. Also F. esculentum attracts C. rubecula, but only after a rewarding feeding experience. All three tested flowers seem to be suitable to be exploited in conservation biological control programs to control P. rapae in brassica fields. Even though not every flower offering accessible nectar is also innately attractive, it can still be suitable for conservation biological control purposes as feeding experience can change this attraction. In fact, the application of mixtures containing attractive and rewarding flowers could help increase the success of such programs.
Publisher ACADEMIC PRESS INC ELSEVIER SCIENCE
ISSN/ISBN 1049-9644
edoc-URL https://edoc.unibas.ch/73518/
Full Text on edoc No
Digital Object Identifier DOI 10.1016/j.biocontrol.2019.01.009
ISI-Number 000461038700003
Document type (ISI) Article
 
   

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