"There is a cat on our ward" : inpatient and staff member attitudes toward and experiences with cats in a psychiatric ward
JournalArticle (Originalarbeit in einer wissenschaftlichen Zeitschrift)
 
ID 4513619
Author(s) Wagner, Cora; Lang, Undine E.; Hediger, Karin
Author(s) at UniBasel Hediger, Karin
Year 2019
Title "There is a cat on our ward" : inpatient and staff member attitudes toward and experiences with cats in a psychiatric ward
Journal International journal of environmental research and public health
Volume 16
Number 17
Pages / Article-Number 3108
Keywords animal-assisted intervention; atmosphere; cat; psychiatry; relationship; satisfaction; social interaction; ward animal
Abstract The aim of this study was to investigate inpatient and staff member attitudes toward and experiences with ward cats, and identify possible mechanisms for how cats affect patient satisfaction in a psychiatric clinic. Thirty-three inpatients diagnosed with depression or psychosis residing on wards with and without cats and 17 staff members working on wards with cats participated in semi-structured interviews using a cross-sectional study design. Data analysis included descriptive statistics and correlations. The results showed that 17 out of 19 inpatients and all the staff members liked having a cat on their ward. Further, 12 out of 14 inpatients on wards without cats would like having a cat on their ward. Inpatient perceptions of the cat's impact on the ward atmosphere correlated significantly with their emotional relationship with the cat (; p; = 0.015,; r; = 0.561), how often they saw the cat (; p; = 0.002,; r; = 0.676), and if they liked cats in general (; p; = 0.041,; r; = 0.486). Our results highlight the positive attitudes of inpatients and staff members toward ward cats and the potential of ward cats to enhance patient satisfaction. This influence might be mediated by factors such as the frequency of contact, the relationship between each patient and the cat, and each patient's attitude toward cats in general.
ISSN/ISBN 1660-4601
edoc-URL https://edoc.unibas.ch/71974/
Full Text on edoc Available
Digital Object Identifier DOI 10.3390/ijerph16173108
PubMed ID http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31461841
ISI-Number MEDLINE:31461841
Document type (ISI) Journal Article
 
   

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11/08/2020