A multiplex qPCR approach for detection of pfhrp2 and pfhrp3 gene deletions in multiple strain infections of Plasmodium falciparum
JournalArticle (Originalarbeit in einer wissenschaftlichen Zeitschrift)
 
ID 4513617
Author(s) Schindler, Tobias; Deal, Anna C.; Fink, Martina; Guirou, Etienne; Moser, Kara A.; Mwakasungula, Solomon M.; Mihayo, Michael G.; Jongo, Said A.; Chaki, Prosper P.; Abdulla, Salim; Valverde, Paulo C. Manrique; Torres, Katherine; Bijeri, Jose R.; Silva, Joana C.; Hoffman, Stephen L.; Gamboa, Dionicia; Tanner, Marcel; Daubenberger, Claudia
Author(s) at UniBasel Schindler, Tobias
Deal, Anna
Guirou, Etienne
Tanner, Marcel
Daubenberger, Claudia
Year 2019
Title A multiplex qPCR approach for detection of pfhrp2 and pfhrp3 gene deletions in multiple strain infections of Plasmodium falciparum
Journal Scientific reports
Volume 9
Number 1
Pages / Article-Number 13107
Abstract The rapid and accurate diagnosis of Plasmodium falciparum malaria infection is an essential factor in malaria control. Currently, malaria diagnosis in the field depends heavily on using rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) many of which detect circulating parasite-derived histidine-rich protein 2 antigen (PfHRP2) in capillary blood. P. falciparum strains lacking PfHRP2, due to pfhrp2 gene deletions, are an emerging threat to malaria control programs. The novel assay described here, named qHRP2/3-del, is well suited for high-throughput screening of P. falciparum isolates to identify these gene deletions. The qHRP2/3-del assay identified pfhrp2 and pfhrp3 deletion status correctly in 93.4% of samples with parasitemia levels higher than 5 parasites/µL when compared to nested PCR. The qHRP2/3-del assay can correctly identify pfhrp2 and pfhrp3 gene deletions in multiple strain co-infections, particularly prevalent in Sub-Saharan countries. Deployment of this qHRP2/3-del assay will provide rapid insight into the prevalence and potential spread of P. falciparum isolates that escape surveillance by RDTs.
Publisher Springer Nature
ISSN/ISBN 0169-5487
edoc-URL https://edoc.unibas.ch/71973/
Full Text on edoc Available
Digital Object Identifier DOI 10.1038/s41598-019-49389-2
PubMed ID http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31511562
ISI-Number MEDLINE:31511562
Document type (ISI) Journal Article
 
   

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