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Physical activity and self-esteem: testing direct and indirect relationships associated with psychological and physical mechanisms
JournalArticle (Originalarbeit in einer wissenschaftlichen Zeitschrift)
 
ID 4421460
Author(s) Zamani Sani, Seyed Hojjat; Fathirezaie, Zahra; Brand, Serge; Pühse, Uwe; Holsboer-Trachsler, Edith; Gerber, Markus; Telepasand, Siavash
Author(s) at UniBasel Gerber, Markus
Brand, Serge
Pühse, Uwe
Holsboer-Trachsler, Edith
Year 2016
Title Physical activity and self-esteem: testing direct and indirect relationships associated with psychological and physical mechanisms
Journal Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
Volume 12
Pages / Article-Number 2617-2625
Abstract In the present study, we investigated the relationship between physical activity (PA) and self-esteem (SE), while introducing body mass index (BMI), perceived physical fitness (PPF), and body image (BI) in adults (N =264, M =38.10 years). The findings indicated that PA was directly and indirectly associated with SE. BMI predicted SE neither directly nor indirectly, but was directly associated with PPF and both directly and indirectly with BI. Furthermore, PPF was directly related to BI and SE, and a direct association was found between BI and SE. The pattern of results suggests that among a sample of adults, PA is directly and indirectly associated with SE, PPF, and BI, but not with BMI. PA, PPF, and BI appear to play an important role in SE. Accordingly, regular PA should be promoted, in particular, among adults reporting lower SE.
Publisher Dove Medical Press
ISSN/ISBN 1176-6328 ; 1178-2021
URL https://doi.org/10.2147/NDT.S116811
edoc-URL https://edoc.unibas.ch/62635/
Full Text on edoc No
Digital Object Identifier DOI 10.2147/NDT.S116811
PubMed ID http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27789950
Document type (ISI) Journal Article
 
   

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