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Multiple Sclerosis: Associations Between Physical Disability and Depression Are Not Mediated by Self-Reported Physical Activity
JournalArticle (Originalarbeit in einer wissenschaftlichen Zeitschrift)
 
ID 4393366
Author(s) Sadeghi Bahmani, Dena; Calabrese, Pasquale; Merkt, Helene; Naegelin, Yvonne; Gerber, Markus; Pühse, Uwe; Holsboer-Trachsler, Edith; Brand, Serge
Author(s) at UniBasel Gerber, Markus
Sadeghi Bahmani, Dena
Calabrese, Pasquale
Naegelin, Yvonne Liselotte
Pühse, Uwe
Holsboer-Trachsler, Edith
Seaward, Helene
Brand, Serge
Year 2017
Title Multiple Sclerosis: Associations Between Physical Disability and Depression Are Not Mediated by Self-Reported Physical Activity
Journal Perceptual and Motor Skills
Volume 124
Number 5
Pages / Article-Number 974-991
Keywords depressive symptoms; disability; mediation effect; multiple sclerosis; physical activity
Mesh terms Adult; Depression, psychology; Disabled Persons, psychology; Exercise, psychology; Female; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Multiple Sclerosis, psychology; Self Report; Severity of Illness Index
Abstract This study investigated the interrelatedness of physical disability, physical activity and depression among patients with Multiple Sclerosis (MS). We hypothesized that self-reported physical activity would mediate the effect of disability on depressive symptoms. Twenty-seven patients with MS (mean age: 49 years; 44.5% females) completed self-rating scales covering socio-demographic variables, intake of antidepressants, physical activity, and symptoms of depression; disability was measured by the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS). We found a higher level of disability to be significantly associated with more symptoms of depression. While higher reported physical activity was descriptively associated with lower depression scores and unrelated to EDSS, physical activity levels did not mediate the effect of disability on depressive symptoms. We concluded that increased disability was associated with more symptoms of depression and that self-reported physical activity did not mediate this association even though higher physical activity was separately related to fewer depression symptoms.
Publisher Sage
ISSN/ISBN 0031-5125 ; 1558-688X
edoc-URL https://edoc.unibas.ch/62209/
Full Text on edoc Available
Digital Object Identifier DOI 10.1177/0031512517711851
PubMed ID http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28580876
Document type (ISI) Journal Article
 
   

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