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Early origins of self-regulation and sleep
Third-party funded project
Project title Early origins of self-regulation and sleep
Principal Investigator(s) Lemola, Sakari
Co-Investigator(s) Hagmann-von Arx, Priska
Grob, Alexander
Holsboer-Trachsler, Edith
Albert, Djana
Brand, Serge
Weber, Peter
Organisation / Research unit Departement Psychologie / Entwicklungs- und Persönlichkeitspsychologie (Grob)
Project start 01.04.2010
Probable end 31.12.2011
Status Completed
Abstract Background: Preterm birth has become more frequent during the past two decades due to progress in reproductive medicine, more frequent indicated preterm births due to maternal illnesses, and increasing maternal age. Moreover, survival rates of the very preterm have increased dramatically due to improved neonatal management. However, preterm children are at increased risk for neuronal and neurocognitive alterations. In a related vein, preterm children show an increased risk of sleep disturbances. Therefore, cognitive and socio-emotional development of preterm children has become a growing public health concern. As sound sleep is generally a major determinant of healthy cognitive and socio-emotional development it is important to study the role of sleep disturbance for the development in preterm children. Objective: We address the following research questions: 1) Do preterm and term born children differ regarding indices of sleep duration, sleep continuity, and sleep architecture (amount of NREM sleep, amount of REM sleep) during middle and late childhood (ages 6-10 years). Are these indices stable across the course of one year and are they related to cognitive and socio-emotional development in preterm and term born children? 2) Do preterm and term born children differ regarding further EEG-derived indices of sleep (beside measures of sleep duration, continuity, and architecture) such as sleep spindle characteristics and power spectral measures? Are these characteristics stable across the follow-up period of one year and are they related to cognitive and socio-emotional development in preterm and term born children? 3) Do preterm and term born children differ regarding HPA-axis function as measured by cortisol reactivity to cognitive testing and cortisol awakening response? Is the HPA-axis function related to cognitive performance, socio-emotional development, and/or EEG-derived sleep indices in preterm and term born children? Design and Method: In August 2011 recruitment of 50 preterm children (<32nd week of gestation) born between 2001 and 2006 in the University Children's Hospital Basel started along with recruitment of a control group of 50 term born children. The first assessment wave includes cognitive testing of the child, one night sleep EEG-assessment at the child’s home, assessment of children’s HPA-axis function by saliva samples. Moreover, parents provide reports of the child’s socio-emotional development, child’s general sleep patterns, family functioning, and their own well-being. Relevance and impact: The study will provide information on the role of sleep for development in preterm and term born children. Interventions addressing sleep in preterm children will profit from the generated evidence.
Keywords preterm birth, sleep-EEG, cognitive development, socio-emotional development, childhood
Financed by University of Basel
   

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22/06/2024