Tightly bound soil water introduces isotopic memory effects on mobile and extractable soil water pools
JournalArticle (Originalarbeit in einer wissenschaftlichen Zeitschrift)
 
ID 3882719
Author(s) Newberry, Sarah L.; Prechsl, Ulrich E.; Pace, Matthew; Kahmen, Ansgar
Author(s) at UniBasel Kahmen, Ansgar
Newberry, Sarah
Year 2017
Title Tightly bound soil water introduces isotopic memory effects on mobile and extractable soil water pools
Journal Isotopes in Environmental and Health Studies
Volume 53
Number 4
Pages / Article-Number 368-381
Abstract Cryogenic vacuum extraction is the well-established method of extracting water from soil for isotopic analyses of waters moving through the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum. We investigate if soils can alter the isotopic composition of water through isotope memory effects, and determined which mechanisms are responsible for it. Soils with differing physicochemical properties were re-wetted with reference water and subsequently extracted by cryogenic water distillation. Results suggest some reference waters bind tightly to the soil and not all of this tightly bound water is removed during cryogenic vacuum extraction. Kinetic isotopic fractionation occurring when reference water binds to the soil is likely responsible for the (18)O-depletion of re-extracted reference water, suggesting an enrichment of the tightly bound soil water pool. Further re-wetting of cryogenically extracted soils indicates an isotopic memory effect of tightly bound soil water on water added to the soil. The data suggest tightly bound soil water can influence the isotopic composition of mobile soil water. Findings show that soils influence the isotope composition of soil water by (i) kinetic fractionation when water is bound to the soil and (ii) equilibrium fractionation between different soil water pools. These findings could be relevant for plant water uptake investigations and complicate ecohydrological and paleohydrological studies.
Publisher Taylor & Francis
ISSN/ISBN 1025-6016 ; 1477-2639
edoc-URL http://edoc.unibas.ch/56250/
Full Text on edoc No
Digital Object Identifier DOI 10.1080/10256016.2017.1302446
PubMed ID http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28335613
ISI-Number 000400794200004
Document type (ISI) Journal Article
 
   

MCSS v5.8 PRO. 0.287 sec, queries - 0.000 sec ©Universität Basel  |  Impressum   |    
27/11/2022