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Sociocultural determinants of anticipated vaccine acceptance for acute watery diarrhea in early childhood in katanga province, democratic republic of Congo
JournalArticle (Originalarbeit in einer wissenschaftlichen Zeitschrift)
 
ID 2168780
Author(s) Merten, Sonja; Schaetti, Christian; Manianga, Cele; Lapika, Bruno; Hutubessy, Raymond; Chaignat, Claire-Lise; Weiss, Mitchell
Author(s) at UniBasel Merten, Sonja
Schaetti, Christian
Weiss, Mitchell G.
Year 2013
Title Sociocultural determinants of anticipated vaccine acceptance for acute watery diarrhea in early childhood in katanga province, democratic republic of Congo
Journal American journal of tropical medicine and hygiene
Volume 89
Number 3
Pages / Article-Number 419-25
Abstract

Abstract. Rotavirus and oral cholera vaccines have the potential to reduce diarrhea-related child mortality in low-income settings and are recommended by the World Health Organization. Uptake of vaccination depends on community support, and is based on local priorities. This study investigates local perceptions of acute watery diarrhea in childhood and anticipated vaccine acceptance in two sites in the Democratic Republic of Congo. In 2010, 360 randomly selected non-affected adults were interviewed by using a semi-structured questionnaire. Witchcraft and breastfeeding were perceived as potential cause of acute watery diarrhea by 51% and 48% of respondents. Despite misperceptions, anticipated vaccine acceptance at no cost was 99%. The strongest predictor of anticipated vaccine acceptance if costs were assumed was the educational level of the respondents. Results suggest that the introduction of vaccines is a local priority and local (mis)perceptions of illness do not compromise vaccine acceptability if the vaccine is affordable.

Publisher Williams and Wilkins
ISSN/ISBN 0002-9637
edoc-URL http://edoc.unibas.ch/dok/A6174421
Full Text on edoc No
Digital Object Identifier DOI 10.4269/ajtmh.12-0643
PubMed ID http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23878187
ISI-Number WOS:000326129900005
Document type (ISI) Journal Article
 
   

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16/06/2024