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Individual and contextual factors influencing patient attrition from antiretroviral therapy care in an urban community of Lusaka, Zambia
JournalArticle (Originalarbeit in einer wissenschaftlichen Zeitschrift)
 
ID 1634864
Author(s) Musheke, Maurice; Bond, Virginia; Merten, Sonja
Author(s) at UniBasel Merten, Sonja
Year 2012
Title Individual and contextual factors influencing patient attrition from antiretroviral therapy care in an urban community of Lusaka, Zambia
Journal Journal of the International AIDS Society
Volume 15 Suppl 1
Number Suppl. 1
Pages / Article-Number 1-9
Abstract Despite the relatively effective roll-out of free life-prolonging antiretroviral therapy (ART) in public sector clinics in Zambia since 2005, and the proven efficacy of ART, some people living with HIV (PLHIV) are abandoning the treatment. Drawing on a wider ethnographic study in a predominantly low-income, high-density residential area of Lusaka, this paper reports the reasons why PLHIV opted to discontinue their HIV treatment.Opened-ended, in-depth interviews were held with PLHIV who had stopped ART (n =25), ART clinic staff (n=5), religious leaders (n=5), herbal medicine providers (n=5) and lay home-based caregivers (n=5). In addition, participant observations were conducted in the study setting for 18 months. Interview data were analysed using open coding first, and then interpreted using latent content analysis. The presentation of the results is guided by a social-ecological framework.Patient attrition from ART care is influenced by an interplay of personal, social, health system and structural-level factors. While improved corporeal health, side effects and need for normalcy diminished motivation to continue with treatment, individuals also weighed the social and economic costs of continued uptake of treatment. Long waiting times for medical care and placing \"defaulters\" on intensive adherence counselling in the context of insecure labour conditions and livelihood constraints not only imposed opportunity costs which patients were not willing to forego, but also forced individuals to balance physical health with social integrity, which sometimes forced them to opt for faith healing and traditional medicine.Complex and dynamic interplay of personal, social, health system and structural-level factors coalesces to influence patient attrition from ART care. Consequently, while patient-centred interventions are required, efforts should be made to improve ART care by extending and establishing flexible ART clinic hours, improving patient-provider dialogue about treatment experiences and being mindful of the way intensive adherence counselling is being enforced. In the context of insecure labour conditions and fragile livelihoods, this would enable individuals to more easily balance time for treatment and their livelihoods. As a corollary, the perceived efficacy of alternative treatment and faith healing needs to be challenged through sensitizations targeting patients, religious leaders/faith healers and herbal medicine providers.
Publisher Springer
edoc-URL http://edoc.unibas.ch/dok/A6094242
Full Text on edoc Available
Digital Object Identifier DOI 10.7448/IAS.15.3.17366
PubMed ID http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22713354
 
   

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