An intrinsic distinction in neuromuscular junction assembly and maintenance in different skeletal muscles
JournalArticle (Originalarbeit in einer wissenschaftlichen Zeitschrift)
 
ID 155369
Author(s) Pun, S.; Sigrist, M.; Santos, A. F.; Ruegg, M. A.; Sanes, J. R.; Jessell, T. M.; Arber, S.; Caroni, P.
Author(s) at UniBasel Rüegg, Markus A.
Arber, Silvia
Year 2002
Title An intrinsic distinction in neuromuscular junction assembly and maintenance in different skeletal muscles
Journal Neuron
Volume 34
Number 3
Pages / Article-Number 357-370
Keywords Agrin/genetics/metabolism; Animals; Botulinum Toxin Type A/pharmacology; Bungarotoxins/pharmacology; Hindlimb; Immunohistochemistry; Mice; Knockout; Models; Neurological; Muscle Denervation; Muscle; Skeletal/cytology/drug effects/*embryology/*innervation/physiology; Neuromuscular Agents/pharmacology; Neuromuscular Junction/*embryology/growth & development/*physiology; Receptor Aggregation; Receptors; Cholinergic/*metabolism; Schwann Cells/metabolism
Abstract We analyzed the formation of neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) in individual muscles of the mouse embryo. Skeletal muscles can be assigned to one of two distinct classes of muscles, termed "Fast Synapsing" (FaSyn) and "Delayed Synapsing" (DeSyn) muscles, which differ significantly with respect to the initial focal clustering of postsynaptic AChRs, the timing of presynaptic maturation, and the maintenance of NMJs in young adult mice. Differences between classes were intrinsic to the muscles and manifested in the absence of innervation or agrin. Paralysis or denervation of young adult muscles resulted in disassembly of AChR clusters on DeSyn muscles, whereas those on FaSyn muscles were preserved. Our results show that postsynaptic differentiation processes intrinsic to FaSyn and DeSyn muscles influence the formation of NMJs during development and their maintenance in the adult.
Publisher Cell Press
ISSN/ISBN 0896-6273
edoc-URL http://edoc.unibas.ch/dok/A5259090
Full Text on edoc Restricted
Digital Object Identifier DOI 10.1016/S0896-6273(02)00670-0
PubMed ID http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11988168
ISI-Number WOS:000175214700008
Document type (ISI) Article
 
   

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