Altered negative BOLD responses in the default-mode network during emotion processing in depressed subjects
JournalArticle (Originalarbeit in einer wissenschaftlichen Zeitschrift)
 
ID 1196763
Author(s) Grimm, Simone; Boesiger, Peter; Beck, Johannes; Schuepbach, Daniel; Bermpohl, Felix; Walter, Martin; Ernst, Jutta; Hell, Daniel; Boeker, Heinz; Northoff, Georg
Author(s) at UniBasel Beck, Johannes
Year 2009
Title Altered negative BOLD responses in the default-mode network during emotion processing in depressed subjects
Journal Neuropsychopharmacology
Volume 34
Number 4
Pages / Article-Number 932-43
Keywords default-mode network, negative BOLD responses, major depressive disorder, event-related fMRI, emotional processing
Abstract Studies using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) show predominant negative blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) responses (NBRs) in regions of the default-mode network such as the pregenual anterior cingulate cortex, the ventromedial prefrontal cortex, and the posterior cingulate cortex. Patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) show emotional-cognitive disturbances, which have been associated with alterations within the default-mode network. However, it remains unclear whether these default-mode network alterations are related to abnormalities in NBRs. We therefore investigated neural activity in the default-mode network during different emotional tasks in patients with MDD in an event-related fMRI design. MDD patients showed significantly reduced NBRs in several regions of the default-mode network. Decreased NBRs in MDD patients correlated with depression severity and feelings of hopelessness. In sum, our findings demonstrate that default-mode network NBRs are reduced in MDD and modulate these patients' abnormally negative emotions.
Publisher Nature Publishing Group
ISSN/ISBN 0893-133X
edoc-URL http://edoc.unibas.ch/dok/A6006925
Full Text on edoc No
Digital Object Identifier DOI 10.1038/npp.2008.81
PubMed ID http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18536699
ISI-Number WOS:000263259500012
Document type (ISI) Journal Article
 
   

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