Affective reactivity in heroin-dependent patients with antisocial personality disorder
JournalArticle (Originalarbeit in einer wissenschaftlichen Zeitschrift)
 
ID 1195185
Author(s) Walter, Marc; Degen, Bigna; Treugut, Constanze; Albrich, Jürgen; Oppel, Monika; Schulz, André; Schächinger, Hartmut; Dürsteler-Macfarland, Kenneth M; Wiesbeck, Gerhard A
Author(s) at UniBasel Wiesbeck, Gerhard A.
Walter, Marc
Year 2011
Title Affective reactivity in heroin-dependent patients with antisocial personality disorder
Journal Psychiatry research
Volume 187
Number 1-2
Pages / Article-Number 210-3
Keywords Addiction, Antisocial personality disorder, Heroin, Opioid maintenance treatment, Startle reflex
Abstract The Antisocial personality disorder (ASPD), one of the most common co-morbid psychiatric disorders in heroin-dependent patients, is associated with a lack of affective modulation. The present study aimed to compare the affect-modulated startle responses of opioid-maintained heroin-dependent patients with and without ASPD relative to those of healthy controls. Sixty participants (20 heroin-dependent patients with ASPD, 20 heroin-dependent patients without ASPD, 20 healthy controls) were investigated in an affect-modulated startle experiment. Participants viewed neutral, pleasant, unpleasant, and drug-related stimuli while eye-blink responses to randomly delivered startling noises were recorded continuously. Both groups of heroin-dependent patients exhibited significantly smaller startle responses (raw values) than healthy controls. However, they showed a normal affective modulation: higher startle responses to unpleasant, lower startle responses to pleasant stimuli and no difference to drug-related stimuli compared to neutral stimuli. These findings indicate a normally modulated affective reactivity in heroin-dependent patients with ASPD.
Publisher Elsevier
ISSN/ISBN 0165-1781
edoc-URL http://edoc.unibas.ch/dok/A6005371
Full Text on edoc No
Digital Object Identifier DOI 10.1016/j.psychres.2010.10.017
PubMed ID http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21075454
ISI-Number WOS:000290183700036
Document type (ISI) Article
 
   

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